Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

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Pokun
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by Pokun »

Yeah, although beer is dehydrating I heard you gain a little more water than you loose from it (same goes for coffee). There is a reason why beer is so good after karate practice when you have been sweating a lot, and I think beer snacks are dry and salty everywhere, fish vs meat shouldn't matter so much for snacks. The "fish goes well with wine and meat goes well with beer" is a thing in French cuisine I think and something followed quite strictly by French food restaurants that serves fried, baked, roasted or boiled fish and meat dishes, and not so much cold, dry and salty fish or meat snacks.
Wine and especially red wine tends to be even more dehydrating than beer so I guess that's a reason beer works better with salty dried snacks.
And yeah a few glasses of water with the alcohol is important to avoid the headache part of the hangover (but might not help as much with some other symptoms of the hangover).

I also know people that made their own beer, mead and wine and it tasted quite alright. In Sweden it's highly regulated what you can brew (strong spirits are illegal to brew).

Is that dried bream in the first picture? It looks very good but it's not very popular food fish in the modern Sweden for reasons I don't understand and no one seems to really know (there is nothing wrong with the taste). It's just one of those silly cultural things that is passed on without second thought, most people haven't actually tried it and just makes up excuses why it's supposedly inedible (which is simply wrong). This seems to be the case with most Cyprinidae (carp family) fish like bream and roach, they are traditionally priced food fish but are not as popular today for no valid reason at all and mostly used as crayfish bait. Crayfish are very picky and won't touch bait that consists of predatory fish like pike, perch or zander (who all eat crayfish), but they feast on the omnivore Cyprinidae (so the opposite of the silly Swedes).

I've never made home-made rusks but there are a few variants of commercial Swedish rusks (singular: skorpa, plural: skorpor). They are nowadays typically eaten with butter and marmalade on top and together with tea, but can also be eaten with soup, coffee and desert.
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aa-dav
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by aa-dav »

Pokun wrote: Sun Mar 31, 2024 4:25 pm Is that dried bream in the first picture?
Yes.
I've never made home-made rusks but there are a few variants of commercial Swedish rusks (singular: skorpa, plural: skorpor). They are nowadays typically eaten with butter and marmalade on top and together with tea, but can also be eaten with soup, coffee and desert.
'Beer rusks' I mentioned before are not just rusks, but spiced with something like boullion cube dust. They are relatively new invention. They were invented somewhere in the beginning of 2000. Basically they are rusk spiced with glutamate boullion mixture from korean instant noodle pack. :D
And they are addictive as potato chips or similar, but have own taste. Rusk texture is very compatible with glutamate boullion. I think they are sold in more quantities than potato chips in my country now. I have no reason to do it at home, but some time ago wife wanted to save old bread and dry it with boullion cube dust and result was not worse than from shop. Taste must be blowing. :) I think newbee must think they are overspiced.
Pokun
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by Pokun »

Oh I see, I've never heard of those. Sounds easy to make from left-over bread instead of dried breadcrumbs, what type of bouillon cubes would you use and about how much?
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aa-dav
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by aa-dav »

Something like maggy boullion cube is ok (first ingridient is salt and saltiness will help control dosage).
Something about 1 cube per 250 gramm of fresh bread.
Bread must be cut to thin stripes (5x1x1 cm for example) and spreaded by cube dust.
Then it must be dried in oven. A little bit crust is good.
Another way is to mix dust with 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil and spill it over bread. Oil is another 'addictive taste improver'. :)
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Pokun
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by Pokun »

Thank you, but I mean what type of bouillon stock: chicken, cattle, fish, vegetable etc.
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aa-dav
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by aa-dav »

Pokun wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 9:43 am Thank you, but I mean what type of bouillon stock: chicken, cattle, fish, vegetable etc.
In short: yes.
Everything you wish.

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Pokun
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by Pokun »

Great! I wonder if things like dashi works.
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aa-dav
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by aa-dav »

I'm sure it will. As I said above 'beer rusks' were created something about 10 years after shops of my country were flooded by korean instant noodle of brand Doshirak. I believe it's not coincidence, but logical attempt to apply the same flavourings to another flour-based product. And the content of the flavorings in the instant noodle pack seems like dried form of dashi itself. Salt, MSG, dried boullion - this is it.
Fun fact: original name of the Doshirak brand is Dosirac. And this is how they tried to sell it here at start. But this word had failed. Do- prefix in russian has meaning 'in addition' or 'to complete action' and 'sirak' sounds like baby talk of word 'to shit'. So they changed it to 'doshirak' which is free of negative connotations. But dosirac is just name for lunch box in korean.
Pokun
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by Pokun »

Perfect I will try it!
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segaloco
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by segaloco »

I felt inspired by this rusk talk and left some bread out to go stale, it was starting to get little white fuzzy bits on it so figured instead of just letting it go to waste, might as well find another use for it. I didn't even think to spice the stuff though, that's a fantastic idea to be honest, and might have to try that with the next round of bread that's going off. What I did do is make a little mix of olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and spices, and drizzled a little of that on pieces here and there for a snack. That and threw in some with some chicken and dumpling soup I've been making lately, almost like putting crackers in soup. Both were wonderful.

Here I was thinking I was going to need to be making some dietary changes soon. I had my first doctors visit in like 12 years because I've been feeling some off and on chest pain lately. I've tended towards a diet with plenty of salt and fat in it, but not like fast food, rather, I cook a lot with cured meats, use butter as my main cooking fat, that sort of thing. Now I'm all confused because I got back my first round of blood test results ever, at least that I can remember in my life, and everything that sort of eating would make suspect is totally fine, no cholesterol or sodium issues, heck, nothing out of the ordinary at all...the only thing that came up during the doctors visit itself was that I apparently have elevated blood pressure. I was kinda hoping the tests would come back as high cholesterol or high sodium or something like that, some sort of reasonable explanation I could tackle through diet. Oh well, I guess on the good side that means my dietary habits are fine as far as blood tests are concerned, but geeze, it's kinda anticlimactic. I guess I'm still grateful that it's had me thinking about the food that I eat, and it's nice confirmation I guess that I'm not doing some sort of irreversible damage to my body. Sometimes I really do have to wonder what it is with the westernized diet that really causes all the problems, because I eat fatty things, I eat sweets on occasion, I know I get more than the daily recommended salt levels on the regular...metabolism is weird.

Regardless, it has been interesting looking particularly at the amount of salt in everything more closely lately. I was very, very convinced I was going to pop some sodium limit on my blood tests so I had been cutting back since then, with the hopes a follow on test would give me an idea of how responsive my body is to sodium limitation. In the midst of that one of the most annoying sodium level things I've found is that various flour tortillas available at the grocery stores I go to all have like 10-15% of your DV of sodium in *one* tortilla, like, why is there so much salt in them? I've gone through phases of making my own tortillas and I think I'm going to pick that back up permanently from now on, because it's ridiculous, just the bread in a meal contributing that much salt, nevermind the stuff you put in the bread, is absurd. Plus, fresh tortillas are quite a bit more pliable and are easier to really wrap around your food without tearing, so I'm sold now. The little bit of prep time is worth them feeling and tasting better as well as not having disastrous amounts of sodium. See what I mean about having a "high sodium" diet, I cook up some eggs, bacon, and refried beans, toss that in a couple of tacos, and get like 25-30% of my daily sodium just from the tortillas, nevermind the salty stuff *in* the tortillas, and that's just breakfast. It's kinda scary when you start nitpicking over the sodium like that. Using off-the-shelf foods, it's easy to blow the recommended sodium levels in just one meal. Then there's the fact I have no idea what is in something I sit down and eat at a restaurant, gives me the willies.

What I can't reason out is whether the high sodium is an attempt at preventing spoilage or an addictive measure like the amount of sugar put it so many store-bought processed foods. Sometimes I wonder if there's going to be an inflection point someday where all the big food producers are actually on the hook for the massive healthcare burden their products lead to in our society, like the cigarette companies and opioid manufacturers... Yeah, there's the matter of the "freedom" to not buy their products, but, especially when you're poor, you don't exactly have the luxury of a lot of options...but when does correlation become causation? Hopefully smarter people than me are studying that in earnest...
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aa-dav
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by aa-dav »

I belive blaming fat consumption for bad cholesterol is mistake. It's not just my opinion, but some shifts in science studies of last 10-20 years.
In fact fat consumption is correlated to bad cholesterol, but correlation doesn't mean 100% causation.
After I lost 20+ks of weight just by rejecting carbs in food (eating fatty and meaty meal) I am living example of 'it's not just as simple as we all were told for years and years ago'.
One of the main sources of cholesterol is inner synthesis in liver. And it's synthesised from glucose (to which most of the carbs converted to in our digestive system). And this synthesis makes short-chained molecules of cholesterol. It's just chemical reaction - from simple to complex - from short to long.
And this short cholesterol is 'bad' - low density cholesterol. Carbs consumption could lead to bad cholesterol on the grounds of obesity and insulin resistance. In this case fat consumption worsens the situation because high calories intake restricts paths of 'glucose depletion' and more of it will be converted to fats/cholesterol.
So, if you have no overweight and have enough paths to deplete intaken calories, it's ok to eat fats. Maybe it's even more healthy than eating carbs.
Also mass cooking is obsessed with idea of 'carbs soaked in fat'. Double kill.
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segaloco
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by segaloco »

Yeah a friend of mine and I were talking about this last night over dinner. It really seems the woes of the situation come from that combination of lots of carbs and fats in the same meals so endemic to the western diet. There's also then the types of carbohydrates involved, whether starches or simple sugars. Most of the carbs in my diet are of the more starchy variety, wheat and potato mostly, rather than things like candy, sodas, pastries, etc. and so I have to wonder if that also makes a big difference. Just this morning I took my leftover chicken and dumpling soup, added some oats and sprinkled flour in to thicken it into a stew, which has turned out pretty good. I like the ability thickening with flour has to help retain heat almost moreso than the thickening itself. That's something I always find tricky, making foods that retain the heat well, because sometimes I don't have my timing down on the various parts of a meal and one thing finishes much before the other, and that part winds up cold by the time the whole meal is done. Luckily too making a soup or a stew usually only involves one finishing part, rather than say pasta, sauce, a piece of toast, some meat on the side, where you have to get all four timed right to have a fully hot plate of food.
Pokun
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by Pokun »

Yes the quality of the carbs has an effect too. Even if you don't want to go all out Atkins diet (which is a bit extreme since it removes all carbs from the diet which may lead to other health issues) you could at least try to increase the quality of the carbs. Slow carbs such as potato, various vegetables, rye and oat are better than fast carbs such as wheat-based bread/pasta, most fried things and sugar-coated cereals that some kids eat.
I recently heard of some research paper regarding this and there were no surprises really, slow carbs and polyunsaturated fat are good while too much fast carbs and saturated fat are bad, things we have known for a long time only there are more research backing it up now.
The old view about fat consumption causing bad cholesterol however, have indeed changed from what I've heard.

Also, I guess too much salt may be a reason for your increased blood pressure.
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TmEE
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by TmEE »

Too much salt is difficult to avoid. Me and the GF have been trying to see what we eat and there's just a lot of salt in everything that you can buy. Eat some slices of bread, use a pack of beans and tomato sauce and already you're at your daily limit... and we have not even gotten to the other stuff like potatoes or pasta which could use a bit of salt while being cooked... Lots of seasonings are also having ginormous amount of salt in it as do all types of ready made foods (that I normally do not eat). It is no wonder there's so many problems with high blood pressure and heart problems in general...

I'm a lazy cook and will do the minimum possible in order to get back to what I really want to do, so my repertoiré is quite narrow but still tasty lol
Pokun
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Re: Cooks of NesDev, What's Cookin?

Post by Pokun »

Yeah well I guess that's one of the main problems when using too much ready-made stuff. Most of the things you mentioned though are easily avoidable, just use canned tomatoes and make your own tomato sauce. It's about as easy to do as the ready-made stuff and you have more control of how to season it. Ready-made tomato sauce tends to be quite tasteless besides the salt, so win-win there.
The amount of salt needed for pasta and potatoes is not a lot and mostly negligible.
Ready-made seasonings like soysauce, tabasco and bouillon are indeed very salty but you also don't need a lot of them as they are highly concentrated.

Beans and bread are quite a bit of work to go non-instant however, as you need to soak dried beans for a day before cooking them (and cooking them may take an additional day) and bread of course must be mixed, kneaded, fermented and baked.
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